MAKING CHAMPIONS OF YOUR CHILDREN

First, work to build your children’s self-esteem. From the day they are born, affirm them a great deal. Believe in them and give them lots of positive feed back. Always express confidence in them and their potential. Try not to compare with other children or with other people. The way people feel about themselves inside is the real key to using their talent and releasing their potential. How they feel about themselves is largely a function of how they are seen and treated by others, particularly their parents.

Second, encourage primary greatness. Teach them that there are two kinds of greatness: primary greatness – which is the principle-centered character – and secondary greatness – which is the greatness that the world acknowledges. That’s been a constant theme. Try to inspire them to go for primary greatness first and not to compensate for character weakness by substituting or borrowing strength from a secondary source (popularity, reputation, possessions, natural talents, and so on).

Third, encourage them to develop their own interests. When you detect real talent in your children, you encourage them to develop it.

Fourth, try to create an enjoyable family culture. Create an atmosphere for your children to get more fun and satisfaction from the family than from the school or from their peers or from any other outside influence. Have your family culture to be fun and affirming and to have many opportunities associated with it. Try to have regular dates, at least once a month, with each child and do something that is special to that child. Try to keep many positive and encouraging events like birthdays, etc. Always express why they love or appreciate each other.

Fifth, plan ahead. Plan several major family events at least six months in advance. Many parents fail to make champions of their children by not planning fun family event – events that become traditional.

Sixth, try to set an example of excellence. Try to excel in what you do so that excellence becomes an unspoken, unwritten norm. You will never have to tell your children to study and to do homework, if they constantly sense the value of reading and learning through your actions.

Seventh, teach them to visualize to help them realize their own potential. Visualization is based on the principle that all things are created twice: first mentally and the physically.

Eighth, adopt their friends. Individual champions are often part of championship teams. That’s why you should invest so much in the team and clubs, schools and classes, your children belong to. When family, friends and school are all aligned, it makes a powerful training system. Anytime something gets out of alignment – when there’s a problem with a peer, for example – just adopt the peer. It’s better than trying to get them to drop the peer.

Ninth, teach them to have faith, to believe and trust others, and to affirm, build, bless and serve others. Empathy is the key to influence. You’ve got to be very sensitive to the feeling and perceptions of others. If you are going to build champions, you’ve got to take an interest in people, especially the downcast and outcast. The key to the ninety-nine, is the one.

Tenth, provide support, resources and feedback. Give honest feed back based on results and teach your children the value of feed back. Feed back is breakfast for champions. Steven Covey

Leave A Response

* Denotes Required Field